KEEN Trailhead Pyrenees Hiking Boot

Review by Arnie P

KEEN Trailhead Pyrenees Hiking Boot

Keen Pyrenees boots

Keen Pyrenees boots

The Trailhead Pyrenees hiking boots were provided by Keen for the purpose of this review.

The Keen Pyrenees boot is part of the Keen Trailhead family. At first glance I thought I was looking at a boot from my childhood when all boots were leather. The leather is the only aspect that is the same. The leather is brown and has a very soft feel and is pliable to the touch. The foot bed is removable. The toes area is well protected which I appreciate because I have had many toe nail blood blisters in the past.

Data and Materials from web site

The pair I will be wearing are size 9. Listed Weight: 17 oz ( 482 g) per boot Measured Weight left shoe: 19.1 oz (542 g) Measured Weight right shoe: 19.4 oz (549 g) Uppers: Waterproof leather Bottoms: Nonmarking rubber Lining: KEEN.DRY™ Waterproof / breathable textile Removable metatomical Footbed S3 Heel support structure Toe protection Torsion stability ESS shank 4mm multi-directional traction lugs Color: Bison Product care Gently brush the footwear with a damp, soft sponge or hand towel to remove loose dirt and restore surface. Stains should be treated immediately with a gentle solvent-based cleaner. This process may cause slight discoloration to the affected area.

bottoms

bottoms

toe

toe

lower eyelets

lower eyelets

upper eyelets

upper eyelets

heel pull loop

heel pull loop

Laces

I think laces are a lot more important than most people think. They help keep the foot in place. This in turn helps prevent blisters and the slipping of the foot into the toe area of the shoe. The eyelets for the laces are riveted into the shoe. The lower 6 eyelets are the type where the lace is threaded through a hole. The upper 6 eyelets are a hook type and the laces quickly slip into place. I like being able to quickly unloosen the top hooks quickly. The loop at the heel of the boot is also very useful in putting on the boots.

The soles of the boot

Spring in New England is a very challenging time for hiking. At the lower elevations the snow has melted leaving puddles and mud. At the higher elevations the hard packed trail is mostly ice and, on either side of the trail, the snow is soft and offers no support when stepping off trail. Both conditions can cause the threads of the boot to become clogged with snow or mud. This usually results in a loss of traction. The raised parts of the sole are made of irregular shapes and about half of them have beveled sides. This I believe will help prevent the soles from being clogged with snow or mud. I will be checking this out for my next report. Trying the boots I have size D width and I put on a heavy pair of wool socks. My foot slid in with very little effort. There was a little space and that is good. Feet expand a little while hiking, especially on hikes that are typically in the 7 to 12 hours in length. I walked around the house and quickly discovered I will not be using the top lug when lacing my boots at least during a break in period. This is where the shoe molds to the shape of my feet. I avoid a tight fit above the ankle to insure good circulation. I always want my feet to be warm and dry. I am looking forward to telling you what I have found out in my next update. Check back in about a month to learn more about my experiences with the Keen Pyrenees boot.

Hiking on the Merrimack River Trail

Hiking on the Merrimack River Trail

KeenTrailhead Pyrenees Hiking Boot Update

April 13, 2010

Pyrenees on Merrimack River Trail

Pyrenees on Merrimack River Trail

I have not worn a leather boot for a long time and I had forgotten that it does take time for the boots to go through a break in period.  The good news is the comfort increases with use.  The tops after several hikes are now very comfortable.  I sometimes have to loosen the top of the boots for better comfort.  The downside is this allows for some debris to enter occasionally.  I may get dust gaiters to solve that problem, and they are a good idea anyway.  I have been wearing these boots on trails with mud, water and lots of irregular shaped granite.  The boots are providing good isolation on the hard rock surfaces.  The ankle high boot are also protecting me from rocks that brush against my ankles.  There are a lot fewer trails items that can bother me in these boots and I can spend more time on the scenery.  This also increases my speed on the trail.  I do not get any accumulation of mud on the bottoms of my boots.

Are these boots waterproof

I live in a part of New England that recently got flooded.  I had about 3 inches of water to deal with in my cellar.  I spent several hours in these boots walking in this water and not getting wet at all.  I have gotten flooded in the past and have always gotten wet at some point during the process of getting the water out of the cellar.  On the trail I have had to cross wet areas and stream crossing where there were submerged rocks in the stream and did not get wet.  I feel that the Pyrenees boots are waterproof, and are keeping my feet dry and comfortable

Getting ready for backpacking

I try out all the items I will be using on a backpack before the actual backpack.  On a couple of recent hikes I have put some of the items I will be using on a backpack to see how well the Pyrenees handle a heavier load.  I am very pleased with ability of the boot to act like a shock absorber and provide stability and comfort.  I will soon be spending a week in the White Mountains and will be using these boots everyday.  Check back in about a month for my final update.
Hiking on the Merrimack River Trail

Hiking on the Merrimack River Trail

Keen Trailhead Pyrenees boot a last look 5-18-10

Recently I spent a week in the Franconia Notch area of New Hampshire. The weather was great with rain only for half a day. I wore the boots whenever I went hiking and they provided excellent traction on the rocks. I encountered wet and muddy areas which also were not a problem. I have walked through a lot of muddy areas, but it seems when I got back to the car and stomped my feet the Pyrenees were usually quite clean. Three days before I arrived the in this area, 13 inches of snow had fallen and was melting fast with the daytime temperatures in the 60-80 F range. I had ample opportunity to hike in slush, mud and dry areas all in the same hike. During most of the week, I had the boots on all day. I had no discomfort at all during this period. When I took my boots off at the end of the day, my feet felt basically the same. When I have used the boots with snowshoes, the boots were very comfortable and did not interfere with using the snowshoes. On a warm day, when I was snowshoeing in deep snow that was melting on my boots, I was still warm and dry. If snow did get inside the boot, then I did get wet. I carry gaiters with me if that becomes a problem. In weather when the temperature was about 15 F, my feet were always warm and dry. Now that the weather has gotten a lot warmer, I have hiked several times with the temperatures above 80 F and my feet did not get too hot or very sweaty. I wear wool socks almost all the time and my feet have been reasonably dry and very comfortable. I don’t think this would be happening if the boots were not ventilating properly. I will probably be wearing these boots during the entire year. I am as pleased with the Pyrenees boots as I am with my other excellent Keen footwear.  I wish to thank Keen and 4alloutdoors.org for the opportunity to test these boots.

no slipping here

no slipping here

last of the snow on Peobody slopes

last of the snow on Peobody slopes

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